BBP’s Consort: Glossary

I recommend you use Ctrl+F or the search function on whatever device you are on to find what you’re looking for. Terms are listed with Chinese first, the way I’m translating it as, followed by the meaning or what I think it is, and lastly, the chapter where I noted it down. This is partially for me to keep my terms consistent so there’ll be plenty of terms that don’t really need explaining included.
But, if I miss something you think I should add, leave a comment or email me. If you have suggestions or corrections from some of these tentative terms, than definitely email me at [email protected]!

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苏七七 – “Su Qi Qi” Main Character (1)
莫问尘 – “Mo Wen Chen” MC’s husband (1)
表小姐花千姿 – “Cousin Miss Hua Qian Zi” Mo Wen Chen’s cousin who managed the household (3)
冷言 – “Leng Yan” imperial guard watching over Mo Wen Chen (6)
雷堡主 – “Lei bao zhu” Lei clan’s family head (7)
国师 – “Nation masters” teachers of the state. (12)
焚文 – “Fen Wen” Cyan-clothed man that saved Su Qi Qi from the abyss (20)
苏世昌 – “Su Shi Chang” Prime Minister and Su Qi Qi’s father (22)
贺一天 – “He Yi Tian” The Shadow Blade House’s Housemaster (22)

Titles/Ways to address someone:
丫头 – “yatou” = servant girl (2)
王爷 – “wang ye” = Prince/Master (2)
王妃 – “wang fei” the official wife of the Wang Ye, aka Princess Consort/Imperial Consort (2)
天子 – “Emperor” = the (rightful) emperor, the “Son of Heaven”(2)
娘娘 – “niang niang” = suffix which should only be applied to the empress or imperial concubines, is required to show respect (3)
表哥 – “biao ge” = Older cousin brother (3)
本宫 – “ben gong” = Ben Gong is a way of referring to oneself, employed by an empress or a high-ranking consort when speaking to a person or an audience of lower rank or status (4)
管事 – “manager” (6)
管家 – “steward” higher ranking that manager (6)
老奴 – “old nu” nu translates to slave. It’s a way for servants to refer to themselves. (6)
奴才 – “nu cai” means slave, but refers to servant. It is also a way for servants to refer themselves so I’ll be using nu cai and servant interchangably. (6)
大人 – “da ren” Sir/Madam. A suffix used for an official or a person in authority. (6)
保护神 – “guardian saint” (6)
陛下 – “bi xia” means your majesty. Used by officials when they address the emperor directly. (6)
医者 – “healer” (7)
本王 – “ben wang” way for speaker to refer to themself in third person. Aka, something like ‘this king’ or ‘this imperial son’ (8)
福伯 – “uncle” not actually blood related though (10)
皇兄 – “Imperial elder brother” in Chinese though, it’s formal and respectful, but less of a mouthful (12)
妾 – “qie” concubine; this consort (12)
浊世佳公子 – “Zhuo Shi Jia gongzi” I think, is a character from a poem written by Nalan Xingde, a Manchu ethic Qing dynasty poet. Basically the character is described as an elegant beautiful youth. “gongzi” which will probably be used in the future is a way of saying and addressing young man, typically used towards nobles. (13)
爱妃 – “dear imperial consort” just a way to address a wife, not with affection, but suggesting it for appearances. love fei… (14)
朕 – “zhen” way for the king to refer to himself (14)
皇弟 – “imperial younger brother” (15)
姐姐 – “jie jie” Older sister, can be used to address people not blood related (15)
妹妹 – “mei mei” same except younger sister (15)
大娘 – “da niang” it’s defined as aunt (polite address) but I think in ancient China, it was what the concubine’s children had to call the main wife of a family. As the ‘big mother’. (15)

北定王府 – “Bei Ding Wang residence” Wang Residence = Prince’s Mansion (2)
燕国 – “nation of Yan” nation Mo Wen Chen guarded (6)
雷家堡 – “Lei clan residence”Lei Jia Bao seems to be referring to the residence/castle of the Lei family. (7)
正院 – “main courtyard” (8)
奥城 – “Magnetic capital” Aocheng, Chinese city (13)
倚荷院 – “Lotus courtyard” (14)
都城 – “Capital City” Ducheng (16)
断涯 – “Duan Ya” (18)
偏院 – “Pian Courtyard” Hua Qian Zi’s courtyard (18)
江湖 – “Jiang Hu” a place that often appears in wuxia stories, a community of martial artists. Probably also once a real place. Have some other meanings, but the first one is the most common. (20)

扇形玉 – “jade pendant” a fan-shaped jade pendant (2)
千年影灵芝和无根果 – “Millennium Shadow Lingzhi Mushroom and Rootless Fruit” (18)
追风箭 – “Wind Chasing Arrow” (22)

金创药 – “Golden Wound Medicine” (10)

虎落平阳 – “tiger thrown out of Ping Yan” is a saying. I’ve understood to the point that a tiger symbolizes a dignified and strong creature. Ping Yan is, according to baidu, a bright and ‘level’ place. The tiger leaves the deep mountains and fell to the ‘level’ ground to suffer. Symbolizes losing power. (6)
人人得而诛之 – “being hunted to death” It’s not that gruesome, I think. It’s basically a death sentence, except they let it be known that anyone is allowed to kill him. (15)
强龙不压地头蛇 – “a powerful dragon cannot crush a snake in its old haunts” (15)
仙风道骨 – The meaning is it describes a person’s strength of character 风骨 (So that’s where the wind bones came from) and spirit which stands out from the masses. (20)
人外有人,天外有天 – “There are people beyond this person and skies beyond this sky” No matter how good you think you are, there is always someone out there that is better. (22)

Martial Arts:
内力 – “Inner qi” will be used interchangeably with inner strength and nei gong which is the actual type of martial arts. (8) (17)
轻功 – “Qing gong” is a sort of martial arts, the ‘light’ martial arts. People can walk on water and on air with this. (20)

血卫队 – “Blood Troops” (22)
影卫队 – “Shadow Troops” (22)
影刃楼 – “Shadow Blade House” I’m guessing mercenaries? (22)

Other terms:
五更 – “Wu Geng” old chinese time measurement= 3am-5am (2)
万岁万岁万万岁/ 千岁千岁千千岁 – “may the king live for ten thousands of glorious years” “may the queen live for thousands of blessed years” (14)
里 – ‘li’ chinese unit of measurement, approximately 500 meters (19)

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